What's Hot In Physics> 2010

Year: 2010

The Top Ten lists in Physics feature papers published during the last two years (excluding review articles) that were most cited in current journal articles indexed by Clarivate Analytics during a recent two-month period. Papers are ranked according to the latest bimonthly citation count. The articles below are accompanied by expert discussion and analysis (including comments from the papers’ authors) written by one of four veteran scientist-journalists and longtime ScienceWatch.com contributors.


 

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010

Theorists Provide Smashing Predictions for the LHC

by Simon Mitton

A technician walks under the core magnet of the CMS experiment at the CERN in the village of Cessy. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse.With CERN’s Large Hadron Collider now in operation after initial delays, theorists have been kept busy with predictions about the nature of the particle collisions carried out at the facility. The action of subatomic particles known as partons has attracted particular scrutiny, as these particles do not conform to classical behavior in collisions. A report on so-called parton distribution functions, or PDFs, has found wide utility as theorists attempt to predict the rate of various collision processes.
View Article

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010

Magnificent Seventh Release Of Sloan Sky Survey Data

by Simon Mitton

WMAPReports from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) continue to occupy the upper rungs of the most-cited papers in the main field of physics. Currently, the Seventh Data Release, along with the preceding Sixth edition, are attracting citations at a rapid clip. The SDSS store of data on galaxies, quasars, stars, supernovae, and other phenomena—all of it freely available online and open to anyone—embodies a new kind of science.
View Article

JULY/AUGUST 2010

First Results from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

by Simon Mitton

Structure of the CYP2C19 protein. Based on PyMOL rendering of PDB 
          1r9o. From the Wikimedia Commons.Reports from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) component on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope have begun to register among the most-cited recent papers in physics. The LAT scans for pulsars, supernova remnants, gamma-ray bursts, and other phenomena. LAT data are publically available online, almost in real time, allowing astronomers to see if their target objects are emitting gamma rays. The initial “quick look” report from LAT promises much more data to come.
View Article

MAY/JUNE 2010

Polymer Solar Cells Near 100% Quantum Efficiency

by Simon Mitton

Alan HeegerRecent materials research has succeeded in producing polymer solar cells with an internal quantum efficiency of nearly 100%--in other words, nearly every absorbed photon is converted into a charge carrier. To accomplish this, the team of researchers employed layered device structure. This achievement marks a significant step in bringing polymer solar cells closer to wide application and mass production.
View Article

MARCH/APRIL 2010

Physicists WIMP Out in Search for Dark Matter

by Simon Mitton

The XENON10 detector in operation, with some of the control 
              displays, July 2006.A current Hot Paper in Physics describes the XENON10 experiment at Italy’s Gran Sasso National Laboratory, an underground facility where scientists have been working to detect evidence of dark matter, an elusive material being sought in order to fill in crucial parts of the cosmological puzzle. The XENON10 search for weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPS, failed to detect definitive evidence, but the search for dark matter goes on.
View Article

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2010

New, Improved Data for Supernova Cosmology

by Simon Mitton

The 
              Progenitor of a Type Ia Supernova. NASA.Among the cosmology reports crowding the current Physics Top Ten is a report presenting a new compilation of distance measurements for Type 1a supernovae and their parent galaxies. By combining old data with new, the report corrects the inevitable errors and biases caused by information being collected from disparate sources and time periods, thereby sharpening the picture of how fast the universe has expanded at various points in its history.
View Article
 
Return to What's Hot In... main menu, and select "PHYSICS," tab.
 

   |   BACK TO TOP