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Dario C. Altieri talks with ScienceWatch.com and answers a few questions about this month's Emerging Research Front Paper in the field of Clinical Medicine.
Altieri Article: Survivin, versatile modulation of cell division and apoptosis in cancer
Authors: Altieri, DC
Journal: ONCOGENE, 22 (53): 8581-8589, NOV 24 2003
Addresses: Univ Massachusetts, Sch Med, Dept Canc Biol, 364 Plantat St, Worcester, MA 01605 USA.
Univ Massachusetts, Sch Med, Dept Canc Biol, Worcester, MA 01605 USA.
Univ Massachusetts, Sch Med, Ctr Canc, Worcester, MA 01605 USA.

Why do you think your paper is highly cited?

The article covers various aspects of the biology of survivin, a gene that has attracted considerable interest for its ability to regulate multiple critical signaling pathways in cancer.

Does it describe a new discovery, methodology, or synthesis of knowledge?

The review describes our current knowledge of survivin and its functions, and how it can be exploited for novel molecular cancer therapeutics.

Would you summarize the significance of your paper in layman's terms?

The article provides a broad and in-depth analysis of a pivotal regulator of disease progression and response to therapy in virtually every human tumor.

How did you become involved in this research and were any particular problems encountered along the way?

Our laboratory had originally cloned the survivin gene and has continued to work on the cellular and molecular implications of the biology of survivin in normal tissues and cancer.

Where do you see your research leading in the future?

We remain interested in discovering signaling pathways important for tumor growth, and their potential suitability for novel drug discovery opportunities in oncology.

Do you foresee any social or political implications for your research?

The characterization of novel antagonists of cancer pathways may have profound social implications for the development of molecularly based, "personalized" cancer medicine.

Dario C. Altieri, M.D.
Eleanor Eustis Farrington Professor and Chair
Department of Cancer Biology
University of Massachusetts Medical School
Worcester, MA, USA
Web

KEYWORDS: MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION; SOFT-TISSUE SARCOMA; NORMAL CORD BLOOD; WILD-TYPE P53; PROTEIN SURVIVIN; ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS; GENE-EXPRESSION; COLORECTAL-CANCER; PROGNOSTIC-SIGNIFICANCE; REGULATED EXPRESSION.

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2009 : June 2009 - Emerging Research Fronts : Dario C. Altieri