Sci-Bytes> Top 30 Research Institutions in Oceanography, 2000-2010

Week of May 15, 2011

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Ranked by citation impact for highly cited papers (among those with 10 or more highly cited papers).

Rank Organization/Nation Highly
Cited Papers
Cites Cites
per
paper
1 University of Otago, New Zealand 11 1,628 148.00
2 MIT, USA 12 1,729 144.08
3 NOAA, USA 23 3,092 134.43
4 Rutgers State University, USA 10 1,268 126.80
5 University of Washington, USA 21 2,662 126.76
6 University of East Anglia, UK 11 1,367 124.27
7 National Center for Atmospheric Research, USA 10 1,147 114.70
8 Plymouth Marine Laboratory, UK 15 1,699 113.27
9 Princeton University, USA 10 1,097 109.70
10 University of Southern California, USA 10 1,073 107.30
11 University of California Santa Barbara, USA 18 1,895 105.28
12 University of Tokyo, Japan 10 1,018 101.80
13 National Institute of Water & Atmospheric Research, New Zealand 16 1,604 100.25
14 University of Hawaii, USA 20 1,991 99.55
15 NASA, USA 11 1,086 98.73
16 Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar & Marine Research, Germany 18 1,757 97.61
17 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute, USA 43 4,179 97.19
18 University of California Santa Cruz, USA 11 1,053 95.73
19 CSIRO, Australia 21 2,003 95.38
20 University of Tasmania, Australia 12 1,077 89.75
21 University of California San Diego, USA 23 2,020 87.83
22 Oregon State University, USA 12 1,009 84.08
23 University of Miami, USA 20 1,527 76.35
24 Texas A&M University, USA 10 751 75.10
25 Virginia Institute of Marine Science, USA 19 1,301 68.47
26 Fisheries & Oceans Canada, Canada 10 638 63.80
27 Dalhousie University, Canada 11 563 51.18
28 CSIC, Spain 16 667 41.69
29 Ghent University, Belgium 10 384 38.40
30 Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences (IFM GEOMAR), Germany 10 244 24.40
From Thomson Reuters Essential Science IndicatorsSM database, January 1, 2000 - December 31, 2010.

The table above features the top 30 universities and other research organizations in the field of oceanography based on citations per paper to highly cited papers published since 2000. Highly cited papers are defined in the Thomson Reuters Essential Science Indicators database, from which these statistics derive, as ranking in the top 1% by citations for their field and year of publication. Some 387 oceanography papers were identified as highly cited during the eleven year period 2000 to 2010, and these were cited a total of 35,539 times, for an average of 91.83. Thus, the top ranked 18 institutions not only excelled in citation impact in terms of their highly cited papers but also surpassed the average score for such influential reports.

In terms of number of highly cited papers, as well as total citations, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute comes first, followed by the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of California San Diego (by papers) or the University of Washington (by citations). Ken Buesseler of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, whose specialty is marine geochemistry, is the researcher with the greatest number of highly cited papers (10) as well as total citations to his highly cited papers (1,558). Buesseler is currently monitoring the release of radioactive particles from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan, as he did previously at the time of the Chernobyl accident (view article).

The nations represented by these 30 institutions include, in rank order, United States (17), Australia, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, United Kingdom (2 each), and Belgium, Japan, and Spain (1 each). 

Oceanography as defined here encompasses many specific disciplines and their journals including marine biology, limnology, fisheries science, ecology, geochemistry and geophysics, meteorology and atmospheric sciences, ocean engineering, environmental sciences, and others. Papers published in multidisciplinary journals such as Science and Nature, which could be identified as related to oceanography, were also included in this analysis.

See Essential Science IndicatorsSM from Thomson Reuters for more information.

This item also appeared in the Times Higher Education magazine.

 
 

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