Featured Interviews> August 2010

Current Author Commentaries

In these interviews, scientists talk to ScienceWatch.com and offer behind-the-scenes insights into their research: reflections on what led them to their chosen field, the motivation driving their work in a given direction, and the challenges encountered along on the way. These authors also offer their views on why their work has wielded particular influence in the scientific community, as indicated by Clarivate Analytics citation data, and on how research in their respective fields has progressed over time and will likely unfold in the future.

Featured Interviews for August 2010

 
 
Hans Briegel

"Quantum computation uses the fundamental properties of quantum systems, such as atoms, or photons, for new ways of information processing. Technological achievements, such as high-precision laser technology, allow experimenters today to control and manipulate matter on the level of individual atoms. One can for example use the internal states of atoms as switches to store and process information. By the amazing properties..."
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Patrick Corrigan

"As much as two thirds of people with serious mental illnesses like major depression will NOT seek out treatment or, if so, will drop out prematurely. The big reason: people don’t go to treatment so they are not stigmatized with labels like “psych patient.” One of the major goals of people with serious mental illnesses is to overcome their illness so they can get back to work or living on their own. These goals are thwarted, however, by stigma; by the employer who believes the stigma and does..."
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Eiichiro Komatsu

Eiichiro Komatsu, is Director of the Cosmology Center and Professor of Astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin and lead author of the Current Classic (Space Science) paper for April 2010: “Five-year Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe observations: cosmological interpretation,” as published in the ASTROPHYS J SUPPL SER 180(2), 330-76 in February, 2009.
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Michael J. Mumma

"Our review article focuses on cell cycle kinases as cancer therapeutic targets. More specifically, it provides an overview of the complex mechanisms involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, and the disruption of cell cycle control in cancer. The article illustrates the current knowledge on the actions and functions of specific families of protein kinases that orchestrate several distinct, but intertwined pathways in cell cycle regulation, including the irreversible switch from cell quiescence..."
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Michael J. Mumma

"We describe the release of methane during Northern Summer on Mars, and its subsequent rapid removal – both results are surprising. The release occurs over regions rich in sub-surface hydrogen and also over an ancient volcanic construct. The seasonal nature of this release suggests thermal control of the release mechanism. After three Earth years, one-half of the released methane had vanished. This rapid removal of methane requires a mechanism faster than photochemistry by a factor of about 100..."
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Heidi Phillips. Copyright © F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel.

"I think this paper is highly cited since it offers a way to describe meaningful subsets of glioblastoma (GBM), the most common and deadly form of brain cancer occurring in adults. Due in part to interest generated from The Cancer Genome Atlas Project, GBM is now intensively studied by a sizeable number of investigators, many of whom are discovering variations on the basic findings we describe in this publication. We describe the discovery of molecularly distinct GBM subsets that are prognostically significant..."
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Fabio Pulizzi

Dr. Fabio Pulizzi has been an academic researcher in the field of solid-state physics who is now a Senior Editor at Nature Materials. Here he discusses the Current Classic Materials Science paper for April 2010 by Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov of the School of Physics and Astronomy at The University of Manchester: “The rise of graphene,” NAT MATER 6(3), 183-91, March, 2007.
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Richard Ryan

"We basically postulate that all human beings, regardless of culture and developmental level, have some basic psychological needs and these needs – for autonomy, for competence, for relatedness -- can be easily frustrated as well as easily supported by social environments. If one is in an environment where one or more of these needs are thwarted or blocked from satisfaction, people show decrements in wellbeing and decrements in motivation..."
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Takahiro Seki

"This paper describes a new method to align the MPS of block copolymers processed by light. To align the MPS structure, flow or shear effects, and magnetic and electric fields have been utilized, but this paper describes the first example of photoinduced alignment. The interesting issue in this work is that the cylinder MPS structure of ca. 20 nm diameter is aligned normal or parallel to the supporting substrate of the film, depending on the film thickness undulations of the relief, and in the...."
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Muhamed-Kheir Taha

"Our ambition is to conduct fundamental works that have impact on clinical medicine and human health. Indeed, we are developing molecular tools for rapid detection of meningococcal invasive infections as I mentioned above. We are also developing molecular tools to better define meningococcal resistance to the antibiotics that are currently used in treatment and prophylaxis (beta lactams, quinolons, and rifampicin)..."
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Luciano Telesca

"L’Aquila earthquake (local magnitude 5.8) was a strong event occurred in central Italy on April 6, 2009. The analysis of the seismicity of the area struck by this event was analysed by means of the Tsallis nonextensive statistics, which leads to a relationship between a threshold magnitude and the cumulative number of earthquakes with magnitude larger than that threshold, different from the well-know Gutenberg-Richter law..."
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"My first very significant move toward research was early in 1977, when I went to see Claude Bouchard, coming back from his doctoral studies in Austin Texas. He was intent on starting the population study that became the Quebec Family Study and I offered him my collaboration. Since then we have worked on three phases of this study, covering more than 20 years. Phase one began in 1978 and ran to 1982 and included 432 families. It gave us the opportunity to make..."
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Citing URL: http://sciencewatch.com/inter/fea/feaintaug10/

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