Featured Analyses

ANALYZING TRENDS IN SCIENTIFIC LITERATURE AND THE ENTERPRISE OF SCIENCE AS A WHOLE

Seeds are encased in acrylic poles used for the facade of the Seed Cathedral, the centerpiece of the UK Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo site, in Shanghai March 15, 2010. The 20-meter-high cube-like Seed Cathedral is covered by 60,000 slim, transparent acrylic rods, which will quiver in the breeze, according to the official website of Shanghai Expo. REUTERS/Aly Song.

This section of ScienceWatch.com contains articles drawing on Thomson Reuters unique store of publication and citation statistics. Whether surveying a specific subject area and ranking its most-cited researchers and institutions, or assessing the output and impact of research in a given nation or region, or analyzing trends in the scientific literature and the enterprise of science as a whole—each article is grounded in Thomson Reuters data.

In particular, citation analysis provides authority in reflecting the judgments that scientists themselves make in acknowledging the published research that they view as the most significant and useful.

 
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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011

Chemistry, At the Highest Level

by Christopher King

Seeds are encased in acrylic poles used for the facade of the Seed Cathedral, the centerpiece of the UK Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo site, in Shanghai March 15, 2010. The 20-meter-high cube-like Seed Cathedral is covered by 60,000 slim, transparent acrylic rods, which will quiver in the breeze, according to the official website of Shanghai Expo. REUTERS/Aly Song.Marking the designation of 2011 by UNESCO and IUPAC as the International Year of Chemistry, Science Watch identifies a selection of significant institutional players and international trends in the main field of chemistry, according to publications and citations recorded in a broad selection of chemistry journals over the last decade. Internationally, the Asia Pacific group of nations, as a whole, has made a notable increase in its percentage of the overall field in recent years.
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JULY/AUGUST 2011

For High-Impact Forensics, The Clues Point to Europe

by Christopher King

Human genetic material is stored at a laboratory in Munich, May 2011. REUTERS/Michael Dald.A survey of research in legal medicine and forensic science since 2001 highlights a particularly European concentration in this subject area, with many high-impact institutions situated in Western Europe—notably, in Germany. The majority of highly cited authors, similarly, are affiliated with Europe-based institutions. Among the topics of the field’s most-cited papers are short tandem repeats, the patterns of repeating nucleotides used in DNA profiling.
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MAY/JUNE 2011

Tracking Singapore’s Rise

by Christopher King

A man swims in a pool inside a condominium in Singapore March 21, 2010. REUTERS/Nicky Loh.In recent years, Singapore has substantially increased its output of published papers, along with its overall share of world scientific literature. In particular, Singapore demonstrates a concentration in physical and applied sciences, with its largest representation in the “hardware” sub-field of computer science. In these fields, as well as in various specialty areas in biomedicine, the citation impact of Singapore’s research exceeds the world average.
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MARCH/APRIL 2011

The Hottest Research of 2010

by Christopher King

Eric S. LanderScience Watch offers its annual survey of the foregoing year’s hottest research, featuring the scientists whose recent papers were highly cited on a consistent basis, and presenting the papers published during 2010 that were most cited by year’s end. Among the featured scientists, geneticist Eric Lander (pictured left), epidemiologist Rory Collins, and materials expert Andre K. Geim returned to the list after appearances in previous years.
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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011

Astronomy: Surveying the Surveys

by Christopher King

Sloan Digital Sky Survey TelescopeA survey of astronomical survey reports published since 2000 drew upon some 7,000 papers devoted to such endeavors as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Two Micron All Sky Survey, the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, and others. Of institutions whose researchers participated in the large, international collaborations on these missions, Princeton University and Eotvos Lorand University of Hungary achieved particular distinction in terms of highly cited work.
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2010

Middle East Revisited: Iran's Steep Climb

by Christopher King

Dawn sunlight hits the dunes of the of Al Batin near Liwa in the United Arab Emirates. REUTERS/Steve Crisp.Following up on a survey first conducted in 2003, Science Watch® examines a small group of Middle Eastern nations, assessing their scientific output, concentration, and impact. Of these selected nations, Iran achieves particular distinction, thanks to its steep rise in the production of published reports in the last few years. Some of the other nations, such as Syria and Oman, despite smaller output of papers, also score with relatively high impact in given fields.
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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010

In Latest "Top Ten" Roundup, Harvard Holds the High Ground

by Christopher King

South AfricaIn the latest installment of a series that has appeared every four years since 1994, Science Watch ranks the Top Ten U.S. universities in 21 main fields according to “relative impact”—an assessment of each university’s cites-per-paper mark compared to the world impact average for the field. Overall, Harvard University registers most strongly, appearing in 17 of the 21 Top Ten listings, including seven of the nine biological-sciences fields presented here.
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JULY/AUGUST2010

Where Everything Old is News

by Christopher King

Portuguese director Manoel de Oliveira poses during a photo call at the Venice Lido September 10, 2004. Oliveira is at the Venice film festival to present his latest movie 'O quinto imperio' and to receive the Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. REUTERS/Alessia PierdomenicoTo survey research in geriatrics and gerontology over the last decade, Science Watch© culled more than 50,000 papers published between 2000 and 2009 in specialty journals devoted to research on aging. Among institutions, the U.S. National Institute on Aging ranked #1 by both the measure of total citations and cites per paper. “Alzheimer’s” was the most frequently appearing keyword, and the most-cited publication was the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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MAY/JUNE 2010

South African Science: Signs of Progress

by Christopher King

South AfricaA survey of science in South Africa shows that the nation has increased its output of papers in the last few years, and that the citation impact of those papers exceeds the world average in several main fields. This performance is in sharp contrast to a previous survey in 1995, at which time South Africa, still emerging from the international isolation caused by its policy of apartheid, was notably weaker in science.
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MARCH/APRIL 2010

The Hottest Research of 2009

by Christopher King

Rudolf JaenischThe annual Science Watch survey of the foregoing year’s hottest research demonstrates that reprogrammed fibroblast cells, genomics, and graphene repeat their strong showing from last year, as do several of the featured authors, including Rudolf Jaenisch (pictured) and Andre Geim. Among 2009’s most-cited reports, the five-year data release from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe accounted for three of the year’s top ten papers.
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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2010

Accomplished in Technology: Taiwan’s Research Upswing

by Christopher King

Flag of TaiwanAnalysis of Taiwan’s scientific output and concentration since the early 1990s demonstrates that the nation has been consistently rising in its number of published papers and its representation in world science, particularly in engineering, computer science, and materials. In the life sciences, Taiwan’s output has also noticeably increased in clinical medicine.
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2009

Climate Change Research

by Christopher King

REUTERSTo assess research into climate change and global warming over the last decade, Science Watch examined some 28,000 pertinent papers published between 1999 and the spring of 2009. Among institutions, the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the Smithsonian Institution distinguished themselves in terms of citation impact. The featured highly cited researchers represent not only climate science but such specialties as marine science, geography, and evolutionary biology.
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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2009

Austrian Science: Ascendant in Impact

by Christopher King

AustriaA survey of research from Austria since 1985 indicates that the nation’s overall scientific impact has been rising steadily, from a point well below the world average to a current standing that exceeds the world average and also outstrips the impact score for the combined European Union nations. In particular, the impact of Austrian physics papers has been impressive in surpassing the world average, while, since the 1980s, clinical medicine has improved the most markedly in impact.
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JULY/AUGUST 2009

Brazilian Science on the Rise

by Christopher King

BrazilAn assessment of Brazilian research over the last two decades reveals that the nation has steadily increased its output of scientific papers and its presence in world science, as gauged by Thomson Reuters-indexed literature. As one of the so-called BRIC nations (along with Russia, India, and China), Brazil bears close watching, as its resources and potential for growth are expected to make it a significant player in the world economy in the decades ahead.
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MAY/JUNE 2009

Thought Leaders in the Unthinkable

by Christopher King

A survey of bioterrorism research since 1999 reveals that the U.S. Army leads all other institutions in total citations, while The Institute for Genomic Research is tops by the measure of citations per paper. Highly cited papers include biochemical and genomic studies of anthrax, smallpox, tularemia, and other agents. Other papers examine methods for detecting pathogens by various technologies and discuss general issues of preparedness and emergency management.
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MARCH/APRIL 2009

The Hottest Research of 2007-08

by Christopher King

The customary annual roundup of recent research highlights the scientists who fielded the greatest number of Hot Papers during the last year, and also lists the papers published in 2008 that were most cited by year's end. In the latter group, the physical sciences are especially prominent, notably in reports on iron-based superconductors and on recent refinements to the branch of string theory known as M-theory.
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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2009

Despite Slide in World Share, U.S. Impact Still Looks Strong

by Christopher King

Graphing and comparing the year-by-year percentage share of world scientific papers for the United States, the Asia Pacific region, and the European Union since 1993 indicates that the U.S. is continuing to lose world share, particularly to the collective Asian nations. Nevertheless, the citation impact of U.S. research remains strong when compared to world baseline figures in the main fields of science, particularly in physics, chemistry, and materials.
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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2008

Energy Gauge: Who Exactly Is In Power?

by Christopher King

To survey Energy & Fuels research in recent years, Science Watch collected more than 100,000 pertinent papers indexed by Thomson Reuters since 1998. From this body of work, the most highly cited institutions, authors, and journals were identified. Among institutions, the U.S. national laboratories stand out, as do a number of universities, especially Princeton University, Pennsylvania State University, and Imperial College London.
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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2008

India's New Millennium in Science

by Christopher King

IndiaAfter a long period of sluggish growth, India's output of papers has risen sharply since the year 2000, while the citation impact of the nation's research has also been trending upward, notably in such fields as physics, materials, and other specialty areas in the physical sciences. Figures also suggest that India-based authors are collaborating at an increasing rate with multinational coauthors.
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JULY/AUGUST 2008

With Output and Impact Rising, China's Science Surge Rolls On

by Christopher King

People’s Republic of ChinaA survey of research from the People’s Republic of China indicates that the nation has dramatically increased its production of scientific papers in recent years, with its 2007 output now surpassing all other nations except the United States. The citation impact of China-based research is also rising steadily.
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MAY/JUNE 2008

The U.K.'s Citation Elite, 2003-07

by Christopher King

University of OxfordAccording to a survey of high-impact United Kingdom research based on highly cited papers published between 2003 and 2007, the universities of Oxford and Cambridge achieved the highest overall citation totals, while the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and European Bioinformatics Institute were tops in cites-per-paper scores.
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MARCH/APRIL 2008

The Hottest Research of 2006-07

by Christopher King

AkiraIn its annual roundup of the hottest of recent research, the Science Watch® Newsletter presents the authors who fielded the highest numbers of Hot Papers during 2007, along with the papers published in 2007 that were most cited by year’s end. Notable on the list of authors is Osaka University’s Shizuo Akira, who has now achieved the “hot author” distinction for four consecutive years.
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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2008

Sequencing Biology’s Hottest, 2002-0

by Christopher King

Eric S. LanderA survey of high-impact papers published in molecular biology & genetics between 2002 and 2006 determines that the Howard Hughes Medical Institute collected the highest number of citations, while the University of California, Santa Cruz, was highest in impact.
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Featured IMage: Seeds are encased in acrylic poles used for the facade of the Seed Cathedral, the centerpiece of the UK Pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo site, in Shanghai March 15, 2010. The 20-meter-high cube-like Seed Cathedral is covered by 60,000 slim, transparent acrylic rods, which will quiver in the breeze, according to the official website of Shanghai Expo. REUTERS/Aly Song.

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